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©2019 by Friends of Willow River and Kinnickinnic State Parks

Our Animals

Ambassadors, influencing the importance of all species that make up the parks. Be sure to stop in and visit with them at the Nature Center, or experience an up close encounter during one of our animal programs!

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Painted Turtles

Sisters Susie and Shelly are easily recognized by their beautiful, brightly-colored shells. Painted turtles are common within the park, and can often be seen basking on logs along the river. They use the sunlight to help them grow and digest their food.

False Map Turtle

Morton can be identified by the rings on his shell, which gives him the appearance of a topographic map. He enjoys long walks on the beach and basking in the sun with friends Susie and Shelly.

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Fox Snake

Albert the Fox Snake has been with us since he was a baby. This species of snake is very common within the park and can grow large enough to eat rabbits though they prefer small rodents and birds. Albert is often mistaken for a rattlesnake but he is a non-venomous constrictor.

Corn Snake

Captivatingly-colored Clementine is not a Wisconsin native. Someone took her from her southern home and released her here in the cold. The Naturalist found her and they became fast friends. Clementine is also a non-venomous constrictor.

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Five-lined Skink

Blueberry is a fast moving reptile with an insatiable hunger for crickets and spiders! Because skinks are small they look like the perfect meal to many. Luckily though, if caught in the clutches of a predator, they simply break off their tail and escape. Don’t worry it always grows back later!

Yellow Spotted Salamander

Stubby, likes to smile and enjoys a good chunk of moss or decaying log to burrow under. When he came to us he was missing half his tail, which is where the nickname arose. He is currently working on growing it back! 

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Gray Tree Frogs

We have two! One Wisconsin native and one who hitch-hiked over on a camper from Tennessee. It's facinating to see the differences between the two. They are both masters of camouflage, changing colors depending on their mood or surroundings.